Monday, October 10, 2016

CCNAv3 Completed Packet Tracer 5.1.2.12

Greetings, and welcome to Seeseenayy.
You are visiting one of our many posts about packet tracer activities!

This post contains the answers to the 
CCNA3 Packet Tracer '5.1.2.12'
(above image is a preview of the packet tracer)

This post is split into two parts.
1. The download link of the completed packet tracer, and sometimes completed, or uncompleted PDFs or other files.

2. Tutorial. A text guide on how the packet tracer was completed, command-by-commandstep-by-step.

To view this post, and discover the answers to this activity, click on the following link if you have not done so already.


Downloads / Information
You may find the download to this packet tracer, or any other related file, directly below:




Tutorial
This packet tracer is a skills review packet tracer where you are tested on your knowledge of the following topics:
 OSPF
 Fifth-Grade Reading Level
Anyways, lets dive right in.

Fast-forward the minute your packet tracer loads.
Step 2 asks to verify the current OSPF neighbor states. It asks:
   Which router is the DR? ______________
   Which router is the BDR? ______________

To answer this, we need to open our packet tracer, and enter the left-most router (RA) and check the IP ospf configuration. Enter the command "show ip ospf int g0/0" on the RA router.

RA#show ip ospf int g0/0
"...Designated Router (ID) 192.168.31.33, Interface Address 192.168.1.3"
"...Backup Designated Router (ID) 192.168.31.22, Interface Address 192.168.1.2"

NOTE: It will show much more than the two lines, but if you don't fast-forward your output will be "no designated router" or "no backup designated router"-- FAST FORWARD OR WAIT!

Our next step is to disable the g0/0 interface on RC.
Disable the link between RC and the switch to cause roles to change. Wait about 30 seconds for the dead timers to expire on RA and RB. 
According to the debug output, which router was elected DR and which router was elected BDR?

Our first step is to disable the connection.
RC>en
RC#conf t
RC(config)#int g0/0
RC(config-if)#sh

Our second is to verify the re-election and write our answers. So go back to RA and enter what we did before.
RA#show ip ospf int g0/0

The new designated router is RB, and the new designated backup router is RA.

Re-enable the link between RC and the switch. Wait for the new DR/BDR elections to occur. Did DR and BDR roles change? Why or why not?

When re-enabling the connection, the designated routes do not change. The DR is still RB, as well as the BDR being RA.
RC>en
RC#conf t
RC(config)#int g0/0
RC(config-if)#no sh

The next step wants us to disable RB's connection to the switch.
RB>en
RB#conf t
RB(config)#int g0/0
RB(config-if)#sh

Once done, go back to RA and enter the command to verify the new DR/BDR.
RA#show ip ospf int g0/0
"...Designated Router (ID) 192.168.31.33, Interface Address 192.168.1.3"
"...Backup Designated Router (ID) 192.168.31.11, Interface Address 192.168.1.1"
This means, once more that RC is the (DR) designated router, and that RA is the (BDR) backup designated router.

So far, this is what has been happening:
Each time we shut down the interface of a DR (designated router), the current BDR (backup designated router) will become the new DR.

Now we're going to force our OSPF configuration to have priorities set by us.

Start with RA.
RA#conf t
RA(config)#int g0/0
RA(config-if)#ip ospf priority 200
RA(config-if)#exit

Then RB...
RB#conf t
RB(config)#int g0/0
RB(config-if)#ip ospf priority 100
RB(config-if)#exit

Then RC!
RC#conf t
RC(config)#int g0/0
RC(config-if)#ip ospf priority 1
RC(config-if)#exit

To actually implement these changes, reload the switch.
S1#reload

You should be full 30/30 points. But we're not done.
Go back to RA after fast-forwarding, and find out who is who now.

The DR is now 192.168.31.11, or RA.
The BDR is now 192.168.31.22, or RB.

So for the PDF, here are the answers:
PART I
2.b: RC
2.c: RB

4.b: The new designated router is RB, and the new designated backup router is RA.

5.b: When re-enabling the connection, the designated routes do not change. The DR is still RB, as well as the BDR being RA. Each time we shut down the interface of a DR, the current BDR will become the new DR.

6.b: RC is the new DR, and RA is the new BDR.

7.b: The route didn't change. Perhaps the ID / election did not need change or didn't select RB. Each time we shut down the interface of a DR, the current BDR will become the new DR.

PART II
3.b: The DR is now 192.168.31.11, or RA .The BDR is now 192.168.31.22, or RB.

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