Monday, May 16, 2016

CCNAv2 Completed Packet Tracer 8.6.6.1 (Custom)

Greetings, and welcome to Seeseenayy.
Packet Tracer Details: In this lab, you will configure the network topology with OSPFv3 routing, assign router IDs, configure passive interfaces, and use a number of CLI commands to display and verify OSPFv3 routing information. As well as basic configuration of routers (IP address assignment, passwords, etc).

Note: This is a custom packet tracer.
Note: This packet tracer is used in the "OSPF for IPv6" Tutorial.


Download(s)

In contrast to downloading the completed file, you may follow the tutorial (reccomended).  Tutorial / Walkthrough


1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings
In Part 1, you will set up and configure basic settings on the PC hosts and routers.
This is how your PT should look if opened:



PART I: BASIC ROUTER CONFIGURATION

Router 1 Configuration
Step 1: Configure basic settings for each router.
a. Disable DNS lookup
Router(config)#no ip domain-lookup

b. Configure device name as shown in the topology.
Router(config)#hostname R1

c. Assign class as the privileged EXEC password.
R1(config)#enable secret class

d. Assign cisco as the vty password.
R1(config)#line vty 0 15
R1(config-line)#password cisco

e. Configure a MOTD banner to warn users that unauthorized access is prohibited.
R1(config)#banner motd "Warning: Unauthorized Access Is Prohibited!"

f. Configure logging synchronous for the console line.
R1(config)#line console 0
R1(config-line)#logging synchronous

g. Encrypt plain text passwords.
R1(config)#service password-encryption

h. Configure the IPv6 unicast and link-local addresses listed in the Addressing Table for all interfaces.
R1(config)#int g0/0
R1(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1/64 
R1(config-if)#ipv6 add FE80::1 link-local
R1(config-if)#exit
R1(config)#int s0/0/0
R1(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::1/64

R1(config-if)#ipv6 add FE80::1 link-local
R1(config-if)#exit
R1(config)#int s0/0/1
R1(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::2/64

R1(config-if)#ipv6 add FE80::1 link-local

i. Enable IPv6 unicast routing on each router.
R1(config)#ipv6 unicast-routing

j. Copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.
R1#wr

Router 2 Configuration
Above were the steps for R1. Now, lets go to R2. Same configuring, different numbers/addresses.
To save us some space, I'm going to just leave the commands below. It's the same process for the entire router above.
Router>en
Router#conf t
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#hostname R2
R2(config)#no ip domain-lookup
R2(config)#enable secret class
R2(config)#line vty 0 15
R2(config-line)#password cisco
R2(config-line)#logging synchronous
R2(config-line)#login
R2(config-line)#exit
R2(config)#line console 0
R2(config-line)#logging synchronous
R2(config-line)#password cisco
R2(config-line)#login
R2(config-line)#exit
R2(config)#banner motd "Unauthorized Access Is Prohibited!"
R2(config)#ipv6 unicast-routing
R2(config)#int g0/0
R2(config-if)#exit
R2(config)#int g0/0

R2(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::2/64
R2(config-if)#ipv6 add FE80::2 link-local
R2(config-if)#no sh
R2(config-if)#exit
R2(config)#int s0/0/0
R2(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2/64
R2(config-if)#ipv6 add FE80::2 link-local
R2(config-if)#no sh
R2(config-if)#exit
R2(config)#int s0/0/1
R2(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::2/64
R2(config-if)#ipv6 add FE80::2 link-local
R2(config-if)#no sh
R2(config-if)#exit
R2(config)#service password-encryption 
R2(config)#exit
R2#wr

Router 3 Configuration
Since we've configured R1 and R2, we'll move on to R3, the final router configuration before we enter OSPF as a whole. Again, same process.
Router>en
Router#conf t
Router(config)#hostname R3
R3(config)#banner motd "Unauthorized Access Prohibited!"
R3(config)#no ip domain-lookup
R3(config)#ipv6 unicast-routing
R3(config)#enable secret class
R3(config)#line vty 0 15
R3(config-line)#password cisco
R3(config-line)#logging synchronous
R3(config-line)#login
R3(config-line)#exit
R3(config)#line console 0
R3(config-line)#logging synchronous
R3(config-line)#password cisco
R3(config-line)#login
R3(config-line)#exit
R3(config)#int g0/0

R3(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:DB8:ACAD:C::3/64
R3(config-if)#ipv6 add FE80::3 link-local
R3(config-if)#no sh
R3(config-if)#exit
R3(config)#int s0/0/0
R3(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:DB8:ACAD:13::3/64
R3(config-if)#ipv6 add FE80::3 link-local
R3(config-if)#no sh
R3(config-if)#exit
R3(config)#int s0/0/1
R3(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:DB8:ACAD:23::3/64
R3(config-if)#ipv6 add FE80::3 link-local
R3(config-if)#no sh
R3(config-if)#exit

R3(config)#

Give the PCs addresses. It's up to you to find which belongs to which, but this is how they should look. 


PC-A Configuration:
IP Address2001:DB8:ACAD:A::A/64
Link LocalFE80::1
IPv6 Gateway2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1


PC-B Configuration:
IP Address2001:DB8:ACAD:B::B/64
Link LocalFE80::2
IPv6 Gateway2001:DB8:ACAD:B::2

PC-C Configuration:
IP Address2001:DB8:ACAD:C::C/64
Link LocalFE80::3
IPv6 Gateway2001:DB8:ACAD:C::3


As asked by the PKT, we should be able to ping our own routers and so.
Example, PC-A should be able to ping R1, which they're able to following the provided configuration.
Pinging 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1: bytes=32 time=20ms TTL=255
Reply from 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1: bytes=32 time=0ms TTL=255
Reply from 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1: bytes=32 time=0ms TTL=255

Reply from 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1: bytes=32 time=0ms TTL=255

As well as our router to router configuration, like so.
R1#ping 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2

Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 2001:DB8:ACAD:12::2, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 4/6/14 ms


Believe me, if you don't test this prior to doing Part II, you're going to have headaches.
TEST YOUR CONNECTIONS! ALL ENDS!
Your PT should look like this now.


If you did, you may proceed.

PART II: OSPF CONFIGURATION
The assignment wants us to assign route-ids and then share actually configure, so we will do so.

R1#conf t
R1(config)#ipv6 router ospf 1

R1(config-rtr)#router-id 1.1.1.1
R1(config-rtr)#exit
R1(config)#

R2#conf t
R2(config)#ipv6 router ospf 1
R2(config-rtr)#router-id 2.2.2.2
R2(config-rtr)#exit

R2(config)#

R3#conf t
R3(config)#ipv6 router ospf 1
R3(config-rtr)#router-id 3.3.3.3
R3(config-rtr)#exit

R3(config)#

The assignment says we should use 'show ipv6 ospf' to check that the router IDs stay on the routers, but by entering the command above, we know at that time it works. Doesn't hurt to check though.

Now, we need to configure OSPF for the interfaces of R1 (for starters).
The question in the PDF is worded weirdly, but it basically means "put all direct connected interfaces with this command". Read below if you didn't get that either. :P

R1 Router Configuration
R1#conf t
R1(config)#int g0/0
R1(config-if)#ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R1(config-if)#exit
R1(config)#int s0/0/0
R1(config-if)#ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R1(config-if)#exit
R1(config)#int s0/0/1
R1(config-if)#ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R1(config-if)#exit

Now, since we've done R1, we'll do the same to R2 & R3:

R2 Router Configuration
R2(config)#
R2(config)#int g0/0
R2(config-if)#ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R2(config-if)#exit
R2(config)#int s0/0/0
R2(config-if)#ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R2(config-if)#exit
R2(config)#int s0/0/1
R2(config-if)#exit
00:59:02: %OSPFv3-5-ADJCHG: Process 1, Nbr 1.1.1.1 on Serial0/0/0 from LOADING to FULL, Loading Done (This is good!)
R2(config-if)#ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R2(config-if)#exit
R2(config)#


Move on from R2 to R3 to do the same type of configging for said router.
R3 Router Configuration
R3(config)#int s0/0/1
R3(config-if)#ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R3(config-if)#exit
01:00:23: %OSPFv3-5-ADJCHG: Process 1, Nbr 2.2.2.2 on Serial0/0/1 from LOADING to FULL, Loading Done (This is good!)
R3(config)#int s0/0/0
R3(config-if)#ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R3(config-if)#exit
R3(config)#int g0/0
R3(config-if)#ipv6 ospf 1 area 0
R3(config-if)#exit
R3(config)#
01:00:38: %OSPFv3-5-ADJCHG: Process 1, Nbr 1.1.1.1 on Serial0/0/0 from LOADING to FULL, Loading Done (This is good!)

Just to demonstrate the route connectivity, I'll use the show command.

REMEBER, if you're using the IPv6 version for OSPF (which we are), using "show ip ospf neighbor" WILL NOT display the right information. See below! This is how you should be on R3 as of now.

R3#show ip ospf neighbor

(See how it doesn't show anything? We didn't configure OSPF for IPv4! only v6!)

R3#show ipv6 ospf neighbor

Neighbor ID Pri State Dead Time Interface ID Interface
1.1.1.1 0 FULL/ - 00:00:38 4 Serial0/0/0
2.2.2.2 0 FULL/ - 00:00:33 4 Serial0/0/1

R3#

As our final steps, we'll need to configure passive interfaces on our routers.
The passive-interface command prevents routing updates from being sent through the specified router interface. This is commonly done to reduce traffic on the LANs as they do not need to receive dynamic routing protocol communication. In Part 3, you will use the passive-interface command to configure a single interface as passive.

We need to check our interfaces (that go to the PCs from RTs), so use this command to diagnose it:
R1#show ipv6 ospf interface G0/0

This is the result of that command. Sort of useless to show but it helps me understand it sometimes.















So, lets finish this off. Passive-interface for the remaining routes:
R1 Router Configuration
R1(config)#ipv6 router ospf 1
R1(config-rtr)#passive-interface g0/0
R1(config-rtr)#exit

R1(config)#

R2 Router Configuration R2(config)#ipv6 router ospf 1
R2(config-rtr)#passive-interface g0/0
R2(config-rtr)#exit
R2(config)#

R3 Router Configuration R3(config)#ipv6 router ospf 1
R3(config-rtr)#passive-interface g0/0
R3(config-rtr)#exit
R3(config)#

This is how R3 should look. Related, as follows.

VERIFY YOUR CONFIGURATION BY PINGING THE PCS & ROUTERS!
TEST (at least) THE PC ADDRESSES!:
PC-A ping to PC-B and PC-C *Should be successful. 
PC-B ping to PC-A and PC-C *Should be successful. 
PC-C ping to PC-A and PC-B *Should be successful. 


We should now be done, this tutorial is over.
Comment if you have issues, thank you!


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